60 km in 142 seconds

Sitting at my desk dreaming of warmer days like this one when we rode along the beautiful Kennebecasis River. Much of the footage is from the Kingston Peninsula but also takes you through Quispamsis, Rothesay and Saint John.

NOTE: This short video was complied using GoPro time lapse photos (every 30 seconds). I slowed down the shots where we are cycling at a slower pace or stopped.

 

A great day to reach 2,000 km

It was a beautiful day in Saint John, NB. It also happened to be the day that Marathon-by-the-sea was taking place. We were a little worried setting out as our regular Sunday route intersected with the marathon route in several spots. We were afraid of hold ups and being re-routed. Our worries were all for naught. Not only was the marathon not an issue…it was an advantage! Our timing was perfect. We avoided the runners for the most part and the orange pylons set up all along the route ensured that vehicles gave us a wide berth.

We did our regular Sunday route twice (total of 90 km) to get me to 2,000 km YTD!

photo collage 200 km

GoPro handlebar mount review

We installed the new GoPro handlebar mount on my hubby’s bike close to the handlebar stem. The basic mount would have the camera pointed to the side but comes with two additional pivot arms to get the camera facing in the direction you want.

With the camera mounted on the pivot arm the camera sits quite high. This is good because it helps get pics/video without the brake cables taking over the shot but bad because the greater the distance between the camera and the bike the greater the chance of vibration. Thankfully vibration wasn’t really an issue for me today because I was testing out the time lapse mode.

Overall impression: this mount is a much better design that the cheap one I purchased on ebay. It stays in place fairly well. The angle of the camera did have to be adjusted a few times as the joints will move slightly when the bike is subjected to major bumps or vibration. This is fine when the camera is mounted in the front but would be an issue if you had it mounted on your seat post facing backwards since you’d really have no way of knowing if the camera angle needed adjusting.

I’m pleased with the results of today’s shooting. I got some great shots. I put together a video called 60 km in 142 seconds. Check it out here

or click on photo collage below

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New bicycle handlebar mount – Testing tomorrow

Some of you may have read the review of a knock off handlebar mount that I purchased on ebay which failed on the second use. If not, you can find that post here. Hubby did repair the ebay mount but we quickly realized it doesn’t fit our new road bikes. 

The fall leaves are beautiful and I’m dying to take some still photos on our ride tomorrow . I find the chest mount a little cumbersome on the bike so I splurged on a genuine GoPro handlebar mount. The package is labelled Handlebar/Seatpost/Pole Mount.  Stay tuned for a review of how it worked for us

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Testing…is this thing on?

I’m still getting the hang of the GoPro camera. I don’t find the design intuitive. I’m always fumbling with the buttons hoping to press the right combination to get the setting I want. This shot of me was taken in photo burst mode.  Sadly I thought I was putting it on time lapse. Imagine my disappointment to get home and find 3 photos just like this one instead of the 30 shots I wanted (each at 1 minute intervals). Oh well.. I’ll master it soon enough. Lots more rides in the future to experiment with.

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GoPro handlebar mount…you get what you pay for.

I’ve been trying to get some creative cycling footage using the GoPro. I needed a tripod mount. Ebay had some for $5 but then I found a bicycle handlebar mount which included the tripod adapter for $9.00 (free shipping). This is not a GoPro product and a different design than the official GoPro handlebar mount but it looked like a decent design and the price was right.

The mount arrived and I quickly tried it out on a short 20 km ride. When mounted as described in the ebay listing the camera vibrated too much and the mount flopped over when subjected to too much vibration. The next day I mounted the camera upside down which resulted in more stability/less vibration and, because it was hanging down rather than sticking up, the flopping over was no longer a problem.

Shooting straight ahead wasn’t really an option because the brake cables would be in the shot. I put it on my husband’s bike and pointed the camera to the left so that I could get some footage of myself riding beside him. I was pleased with the results. Got some nice video and shots.

Too bad the mount broke part through the ride sending the camera and half the mount hurling to the ground. I heard of this happening before to someone who’s camera bounced in to the road and got run over by a transport truck (they never did find the blackbox i.e. memory card).

Suffice it to say…the design is flawed. The mount would be fine for something stationary such as a patio railing but it does not tolerate vibration well.

gopro mount broken

^^ Vendor: wetech-batteries  from China. Don’t waste your money on this one! ^^

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^ taken with the GoPro mounted upside down on my husband’s handlebars^

“she rides” update

I’m so pleased! I got an email back from Canadian artist Evalyn Parry giving me permission to use her song as the soundtrack to my video. I’ve been recording rides and editing out the best shots for my compilation. I have 1 minute and 49 seconds so far.

I’m a little sad that I don’t have any footage from our recent 100 km ride but the GoPro battery only lasts so long and once it ran out it would be dead weight. I didn’t want to carry any more weight than I had to up and down those hilly Peninsula roads. Yes, the camera is tiny but the entire kits adds up i.e. camera + housing + chest trap + mount + pivot arms. I’ll stick to filming shorter jaunts.

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